15 Best Sprinter Van Conversions [2021 Inspiration Guide!]

Nate Murphy
best Sprinter van conversions

Sprinter vans have long been the van of choice for van campers.

They are compact but big enough to adapt to pretty much any lifestyle.

Handy folk can choose to outfit theirs on their own, while others opt for conversion by a professional company.

Check out our fifteen best sprinter van conversions, each with its own unique set of features.

Let's get stuck in!

1. Bruce Banner Van

Bruce Banner van with a roof-mounted 375-watt solar panel

Bruce Banner may have started out life as a two-wheel drive cargo sprinter, but he is almost unrecognizable now, as a super pimped-out, rugged, feature-loaded camper van! 

Built for off-road and off-grid, this van sports full-body exterior paint coating from Line-X to protect it from scratches from bushes or rocks, and upgraded tires, with locking hubs to turn the four-wheel drive on and off.

This van has outdoor activities covered with built-in bike mounts and an air pump for pumping up tires or water toys. The power system sports 600 amp hours of lithium battery, the biggest we’ve ever seen in a van, in addition to the 375-watt solar panels mounted on top. 

Bruce Banner van kitchenette

The van carries 40 gallons of freshwater, with a Rixen diesel-powered heating system for both the water and the air. We love how the water tank even has a place to screw in an outdoor shower. 

The body of the van sports a full king-size bed, full stand-up stainless steel shower, and kitchenette with a Wabasto diesel stovetop, 85-liter fridge, and 65-liter freezer. The control panel above the bed is one of our favorite features, with in-depth information on exactly how much power is being consumed, and whether it’s coming from a/c or solar.

2. The Climbing Van

Climbing van l-shaped kitchen

Charlie and Dale have created a true home away from home with this van. An L-shaped kitchen with a large sink and four-burner stovetop makes cooking in a van less claustrophobic, and multiple cabinets both above and below the counters offer plenty of storage. 

The standard-sized double bed is in the back of the van, with a bedside table running its length, providing more storage underneath. I love how they added light switches above the bed so they don’t need to get out of bed to turn the lights on and off.

Between the bed and the kitchen are two storage benches facing each other, forming a little seating area. A tabletop slides out from under the bed to turn it into an eating area.

climbing van sleeping area

My favorite feature though is the third bench (that also hides storage) that pulls out in between the other two benches, forming either a u-shaped sofa or a spare bed!

One of the benches houses the electrical, including two 180-amp hour batteries, a 12-volt vuse box, and Vargas monitors for water, gas, and battery. I love that the battery monitor and solar controller are actually app-based which means they can check the levels on their phone. 

In the rear, they have their 65-liter water tank, outdoor shower, and gas water heater.

Movie nights are tons of fun in this van, with an M2 mini projector that sits on the slide-out table, and a roll-out projector screen that hooks onto the ceiling above the kitchen sink! 

3. Boutique Hotel-Style Build

Boutique Hotel-Style camper kitchen with a wall mounted tv

This adorable camper, built by Emily and John, is small, but light and airy. The kitchen features a real porcelain sink and an LPG 2-burner stove, with storage cabinets and a 65-liter fridge underneath. A little pop-up counter extension provides extra counter space when needed. 

The L-shaped sofa in the front doubles as a bed. An extension for the base pulls out of one of the sofas, and a back cushion slides into place on top of it. 

But that’s not the only sleeping space in the van. Alongside the outside of the bathroom, Emily and John installed a second bed! They use it for chilling out or extra sleeping space for guests.

My favorite part of this van is the 32-inch smart TV hidden in a storage cabinet. A remote raises and lowers it, and it runs off an inverter connected to the solar power, so they can watch TV as much as they’d like, even off-grid! 

The full bathroom features a Thetford cassette toilet and a full thermostatic shower with hot water. 

The electrical system hides under the seating/sleeping area in the front. It features a 2.5-kilowatt solar inverter that can handle anything in the van, including Emily’s hair straighteners! 

They also included a Bosch 230 amp pure deep cycle leisure battery, and there is a 300-watt solar panel on the roof. 

Boutique hotel-style sprinter van living area

Another feature I love are the hatch doors above the couch/bed leading into the cab. This lets Emily and John jump right into the cab without going outside, which comes in handy in the rain - or if they need to hightail it out of there quickly!

The garage holds tons of storage and is where they keep their clothes and food. I love how Jon installed the cassette toilet access here as well, so they don’t have to carry it through the van to dump it. 

The LPG boiler and 17-liter water tank are in the garage as well. The water tank has a shower hose attached to it for outdoor showering and hosing down.

4. Chic Off-Grid Camper Van 

The galley in the Dodge Sprinter chic off-grid camper

Callan and Meghan converted their Dodge Sprinter van into an epic, super chic, off-grid home on wheels. 

The first thing you see when you enter is a surprisingly beautiful bathroom, with blue glass tile, a cassette toilet, and a hot-water shower. 

There’s ventilation and power for a composting toilet that the couple hopes to install in the future. The bathroom also has a skylight for showering under the stars - or just for ventilation. 

We love all the windows in this van. There is so much light coming in here, which makes it feel so much bigger. 

Blackout curtains attach to the steel window frames via magnets sewn into the seams to eliminate the light when sleeping, and also help moderate the temperature inside. 

The galley kitchen looks like something you’d see in a regular apartment, with a full oven and a 3-burner range. A 110V  mini-fridge provides plenty of refrigeration, and the large sink features a spray faucet. 

Storage is the name of the game in this van. Cabinets line the walls above the kitchen on both sides, going all the way through to the back. 

The bedroom/lounge/eating area features additional storage under the benches on either side and additional storage can be found along the back bench, accessed through the back doors. 

The bedroom on a chic off-grid van

The lounge/eating area converts into a queen-size bed with a comfortable 6-inch mattress. A little shelf folds out and attaches to a top cabinet with fishing wire to create a desk, perfect for remote work!

The electrical is housed in a storage cabinet above the bed. They have a Rover 40 amp MPPT charge controller running the show, a 12V fuse panel, and an inverter to run 110V power. 

Also in the sleeping area is a thermostat for the gas-powered furnace, a control panel for the on-demand hot water heater, and a carbon monoxide detector. Under the bed on the driver’s side is where the plumbing is located, including a 32-gallon hot water tank.

5. The Ambulance Van

Ambulance van living space

CJ converted an old ambulance into the ultimate camper van for his needs. The kitchen features a 4-burner stove and a small fridge. CJ reused some of the ambulance’s features, like the emergency compartment, replacing its contents with some soda cans, and most of the storage. 

The original window to the cab was quite small, but CJ extended it and made a small door through which he could access the cab without having to go outside. 

The back of the Ambulance van

This camper van is built to keep you warm and cozy in the winter with a little wood-burning stove. A TV mounted on the wall provides entertainment when plugged in at a campsite, and CJ’s laptop, stored on a sliding shelf underneath the TV, is his entertainment hub on the road. 

The solar panel and water heater are mounted on the roof, along with a bike rack and the chimney. The batteries are all stored in an exterior drawer. The gas-powered hot water tank is also mounted externally and provides water for the shower that occupies the ambulance’s spinal board cabinet. 

6. Ski chalet on wheels

Ski chalet on wheels sleeping quarters

What do you do when you want to live in a van but you don’t want to feel like you’re living in a van? For Vince and Kate, the answer was turning the inside of their van into a ski chalet, complete with wood paneling lining the walls and floors, and rustic plaid cushions.

What’s interesting about this van is there is no fridge. Since they’re in the Alps, the couple just uses the uninsulated cab of the truck as a fridge! 

Another interesting feature is the water tank placement. Most vans opt to store theirs in the garage, but here it’s right under the sink, with the fill hole visible as soon as you open the door. 

The outdoor shower hose is right there as well, which makes it easy to rinse off right before you get inside. 

Ski chalet on wheels kitchen

The kitchen features a 3-burner stove and a regular 2-basin sink. The fan in the vent above the kitchen can extract air or blow air in depending on what you need. 

A full-length closet with a hanging rod is another neat feature not found in most vans.

The van sports a king-sized bed. A table slides out from under the bed and can extend almost the entire length of the kitchen. 

The area under the bed also serves as storage for odds and ends and a porta-potty. Because the storage area is just covered with a curtain, a wooden bar slides into place to keep things from sliding out. 

The underside of the bed also has enough storage to slide the couple’s skis in from the back. After all, what’s a ski chalet without the skis?

7. The Five-Years-In-The-Making Van

The Five-Years-In-The-Making Blue Sprinter Van

Ethan’s Mercedes Sprinter van underwent numerous iterations to get to its final, professionally built final version, and we’re loving how it came out.

The galley kitchen has a nice-sized sink and beautiful butcher block counters. The kitchen feels nice and big because Ethan opted for a portable burner instead of a built-in stove, to save counter space. 

He also uses a 65l 12V chest fridge instead of a more traditional fridge, which slides out from a cabinet underneath the counter. Because it opens from the top, less cold air is lost when opening it, which helps conserve energy.

The Five-Years-In-The-Making Van interior

The van sports a full bathroom, including a urine-diverting toilet (good for pee only!) and a hot-water shower. The hot water heater is about one gallon, which lasts Ethan about 10 showers, and is powered by a whopping 3000W Victron inverter.

The bed turns into an eating/work area, and the table swivels for easy access to the storage under the benches. When it’s time to turn the bed into a desk, all the bedding slides easily into the compartments under the base, and a tabletop and base click into position on the floor. 

Ethan made sure to build the bed low enough that he wouldn’t hit his head but tall enough to have plenty of storage in the garage.

Some other neat features of this van include a storage cabinet with a sliding hanging rod, a cell phone booster antenna, and Lumin-x bumper in the front, to keep the van intact in case of an accident or hitting a deer.  

8. The Ultimate Life-Hacking Van

Living and sleeping area of life hacking van

This van is full of the most amazing little hacks to make van life easier! 

Jaqui designed this van to feel more like an apartment than a van. She painted the whole thing white for an airy feel and opted not to use overhead cabinets to keep the space visually clear. 

While she took out some of the bulkhead for extra light, she kept some of it in place as a safety measure in case of a crash. To moderate the temperature in the van, Jaqui uses thermal panels with magnets sewn in to seal the bulkhead opening, as well as the other windows in the van.

Jacqui opted for an Ikea kitchen for convenience, and while it was a bit heavier than building the kitchen herself, she saved on weight elsewhere. The highlight of the kitchen is the beautiful live edge pipin orc kiln-dried countertop, which adds a ton of character, but requires some sanding and oiling on a regular basis.

Life-hacking van's kitchen with a double-burner stove

There is a two-burner LPG stove and no oven, but that doesn’t stop Jacqui from baking anything she wants in an Omnia oven, an apparatus that looks like a lidded bundt pan and sits on top of a burner to act as an oven! A 12V cooler in the garage plugs into the inverter instead of a regular fridge. 

Because she opted for no overhead storage, the bulk of the van storage is in the cabinets in the L-shaped kitchen. Jacqui fashioned a spice rack out of some wood and copper pipes, but to minimize rattling when the van is moving, she fixed magnets to the back of the spice bottles, so they adhere securely to the metal bulkhead! 

Another ingenious hack found in this van are little led lights inside copper pipes everywhere. This helps contribute to the industrial vibe Jacqui was going for. 

The bed in this camper van goes across the width of the van, so it’s a bit shorter than standard beds. To fix that, she added a little slider that comes out of the bed and can act as a base for a bed extension if you want to sleep the other way.  

The bed converts to an eating and work area, with an antique pine table with copper and brass fittings. 

9. Luxury Family Van

The luxury family campervan with her owner

This van was built by VanLife Builds and is an incredibly unique design for families. 

The driver and double bench passenger seats swivel all the way around to face an additional 2 seats for seating for up to 5! Two swivel tables provide an eating or work area and even swivel right out of the door. The seat bottoms lift up for storage, including seatbelts.

The windows in this van have been kept small to minimize condensation issues that can occur with larger windows. They are small, well-sealed portholes that open fully for maximum airflow. 

The van was designed for tiny house living, and so the kitchen is very much van-sized. It contains a one-burner stove, with an additional portable burner in case they need more, and live edge countertops. 

Wood stove in the luxury family van

An ingenious camper hack I love in this van is the use of magnetic strips on the bottom of the cutlery drawer to keep the cutlery from rattling around. Another cool element of this van is the handmade wood-burning stove that helps keep things toasty in the winter.

The bathroom door has a full mirror on the outside, which both reflects light and makes the van feel bigger. Inside is a urine-diverting toilet, full-size sink, and water-preserving showerhead. 

There are two beds in this van, and they are both fixed. The single bed is tucked away under the main double bed and can be used as storage when not in use.

Luxury family van kitchen

I love the laptop and iPad storage area on the ceiling above the bed as well as the flexible reading lights with built-in USB ports. I also love the large skylight above the bed, large enough to squeeze out and onto the roof!

The garage stores a 70-liter water tank, two 130 amp hour deep cycle AGM batteries, with room for a third if needed, and an outdoor shower. The roof holds 480 watts of solar panels and flue for the wood-burning stove.

I love the custom storage rack that includes surfboard storage, but my favorite feature of all is the hammock system. The roof rack on this van is equipped with rods that slide out and can hold two chair hammocks or one regular.

10. Solo Female Self-Build

Solo female van kitchen

Renee’s beautiful camper van is a product of a highly organized and well-thought-out design, not surprising considering she is a wedding planner for a living. 

The table drops down to become part of the base of the bed, but it can also be pushed to the side to allow Renee to walk the entire length of the van. USB and 240v outlets help make this the perfect remote work setup, and overhead cabinets provide plenty of storage.

One interesting thing about this van is that it has no windows. Camping laws in Australia are fairly strict and so stealth was a priority for Renee. 

For ventilation, she installed a Max air fan with a rain sensor, which means it closes automatically when it starts raining. There are also 360-degree rotating fans inside that can be locked into place when driving. 

Solo female campervan living area

A shoebox faces the outside right when you come in, for storing your shoes to thelp keep the van clean. A cabinet facing the door utilizes some dead space to offer additional storage for odds and ends, as well as for the toilet, which slides in and out and can be used for pee only.

Since Renee does not cook much, she designed the kitchen for minimal cooking. There is a small 2-burner gas stove, butcher block countertops, and a beautiful black tile backsplash.

 A large fridge/freezer sits opposite the stove, with a microwave on top. The inverter control panel sits above the counter to run all 240v appliances, including the microwave, and is powered by solar panels on the top of the van. 

One of the most unique things I love about this van is that the storage cabinets are locked via an electric magnet that can be turned on and off to keep the pantry and drawers from swinging open.

11. FedEx Van Conversion

Converted Fedex campervan kitchen

This former FedEx van is now an open-concept camper van! 

The kitchen features huge windows that let in tons of light, positioned over beautiful butcher block counters. The sink works off an electric pump, and the gray water tank is stored under the sink.

This van features a full oven and 2-range burner with a drawer for pots and pans under the oven.

There’s plenty of storage in this van, with overhead cabinets above the counters. A raised lip in the cabinets helps ensure nothing falls off. 

A bench seat hides a chest fridge and they installed a drain in the floor for easy cleaning. 

Because owners Betsy and Justin work full time in healthcare, they included a full-length closet with hanging space in their design. The bed is slightly narrower than queen size, cut down to allow for cubbies along the length. 

the bedroom in a Fedex van conversion

Storage cabinets above the bed hold additional clothes. Betsy came up with an ingenious storage solution for her clothes, rolling them up and fitting them into grids, so they don’t get messy!

A shelf under the bed pulls out to become a huge table, large enough to hold Betsy’s keyboard when she’s practicing. Underneath is even more storage. 

Storage is definitely not in short demand on this van. There’s additional storage above the cab, as well as a pocket organizer on the door and shoe organizers on the back door. 

Stealth was a priority for Betsy and Justin when designing this van, because they’d be camping in hospital parking lots. To keep light from leaking out, keep prying eyes out, and also to help with temperature management, they screwed snaps in all the way around the open bulkhead and snap blackout curtains on when necessary.

The large garage holds a 25-gallon water tank, 1500 w converter, and a 200 amp hour battery that can charge off the alternator while driving. The van also features 300 watts of solar panel on top. 

12. Engineering Student’s Ingenious Movie Theater Van

Reflection of the kitchen of engineering student's van

This sprinter van layout minimizes the sleeping space in favor of a larger kitchen. The kitchen includes a large sink, a 2-burner electric stove (to minimize fire hazards), and some additional counter space.

The cabinets underneath store a 700-watt electric water heater and a 70 liter water system, which can be filled from the side and runs into a 30 liter gray water tank underneath. 

The slightly-larger-than-single bed runs along the one wall, and has plenty of storage underneath, including a slide-out bench for extra seating and a pull-out tabletop. Below the bench is additional storage and a 30-liter fridge. 

Engineering student's campervan kitchen

When it comes to hygiene, Ben didn’t skimp. The shower runs the entire length of the bed. The shower head uses a combination of water and air, allowing it to use less water while still providing great pressure. 

Light is provided by a window in the side of the van, a window at the front into the cab, and a roof vent. White shiplap walls help the small van feel airier and more open.

The van is powered by a 220-amp battery connected to a Rover 40 amp charge controller from Renogy, which hooks up to the 400-watt solar panels on the top of the van. All the electrical equipment lives under the bed and is accessible from the back.

13. Large Family Double Decker Van

Double decker family van and its owners

If you ever thought van life was impossible with kids, guess again. This van was built to host an entire family. 

The top of this van was modified to add additional height. This allowed them to add a double bed up near the roof that the kids share. 

Down below, the king size bed converts to sofas for an expanded living area. The sofas are actually fitted with seatbelts so the kids can be safe riding in the van. 

I love how they stuffed the sofa cushions with clothes and winter coats so as not to waste a bit of space! Of course, there is additional storage underneath the sofa as well. 

The family opted for a convertible bed as opposed to a fixed bed to maximize the living space. With so many people in the van, it was important to them to have enough space to stretch out, even at the expense of a fixed bed. 

Luckily, they haven’t found converting the bed every night to be an annoyance.

Double decker family van kitchen

The counters in the kitchen were actually built from the fascia boards of their old house, and the cabinets are made from reclaimed teak from an old boat. The kitchen contains an Isotherm fridge, Acuva UV water filter, 70-liter water tank, and 2-burner gas stove. 

The sink cover is actually on hooks so when it’s moved to the side, it functions as additional counter space. Open shelving provides the bulk of the kitchen storage for pantry items, and the shelves have bungee cords across the fronts to keep everything safely in place. 

The electricals include a 105 amp hour Lifos lithium battery and a 50 amp DC to DC charger, which helps the batteries charge fully after just a few hours of driving. The roof space was only large enough to hold a 120-watt solar panel, and while the family would prefer more, this works fine. 

14. Simplified Retirement

Simplified Retirement Sprinter van

Retired couple Mike and Ronda have turned this 2016 sprinter van into an incredible tiny home on wheels. This is a great model for those who want to keep things a bit simpler. 

The kitchen features a bathroom vanity as a countertop for maximum space. Mike and Ronda opted for an induction stove, but they still included a hookup for a propane stove should they need one in the future. 

The bar sink is the perfect size for them, and while there is no hot water, they heat water up on the stove when needed. An additional giant water jug with a pump sits on the counter for drinking water, and a shelf above the counter, made from wood and metal pipe, holds all their pantry essentials.

The kitchen cabinets provide plenty of storage for kitchen items and even a port-a-potty that slides out when needed. They use the port-a-potty for pee-only and have bags for everything else. 

Simplified retirement van's red kitchen counter top

This van also features a large closet space with a hanging bar on the bottom and shelves on top. 

Next to the closet is a 62-quart fridge that plugs into a cigarette lighter. Since it is a chest model, they’ve turned the top into a comfortable bench. 

What I love about this fridge is that since it’s right by the door, you can easily grab a cold drink or something to eat, even while sitting outside. 

The bed is slightly narrower than a full queen. It was important to Mike and Ronda to be able to sit up in bed so it sits just high enough to fit bikes underneath. 

Windows on either side open the space up and make it feel light and airy. 

The van has a carbon monoxide detector, a 2000 watt inverter, and a 12V A/C unit. In the garage, there is a 24-gallon water tank and an on-demand hot water tank with a shower.

They’ve rigged the shower curtain to surround the back of the van when privacy is needed.

The rear bumper also pulls some storage duty with a spare tire, a metal storage box, and a firewood carrier. 

15. Luxury Sprinter Van Conversion

Luxury sprinter van's modern kitchen

This van was built for a couple who enjoys the outdoors. The rear of the fan sports a folding bike carrier that allows them to store their bikes vertically. 

In the garage, there is enough storage for a second bike tray, a 40-gallon water tank with a high-pressure hose down kit, outdoor shower, hot water heater, and all of the electrical equipment.

The interior of the van epitomizes modern luxury, with white shiplap on the ceiling and Corian countertops. The cabinets are made from self-healing laminate, which minimizes any scuffing or scratches. 

The window shades on this van are unique in that they can fold up accordion-style when not in use, and snap into place. When you want to roll them down, magnets help them snap into place. 

Luxury sprinter camper van's garage

The modular dinette can be a dining area or lounge space. The ottoman also rolls out and functions as a third seat. 

The galley kitchen features a spacious 4.2 cubic foot fridge, a single-burner induction stove, and a large stainless steel sink.

Inside the full bathroom is a composting toilet and shower. PVC plastic tile mimics the look of real tile while keeping the weight down. 

The sleeping space runs the width of the van, extended slightly by body flares on each side.

Each of these van conversions uses creativity and ingenuity to maximize living space in a small van. Whether you opt for a fixed bed, convertible bed, or even multiple beds, there’s a way to make a sprinter van work for your lifestyle. So, which layout will you choose?

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